3 inventive lighting projects using LED strips

פורסם בתאריך 22 יול 2017
In this video I will be showing you how to build three unique lighting projects at home using LED strips. Here are the quality strips that I used: www.aliexpress.com/item/32855...
I specifically used the 'daylight white 5600k' strips, but the other colour temperatures are great too. Here's an ebay listing of the 5600k variety: ebay.to/2iSqEKu
And an ebay listing of selectable colour temperatures: ebay.to/2zCThDr
Dimmer circuit:
AliExpress: www.aliexpress.com/item/32858...
eBay: ebay.us/qmRdmk
RGB Crystal Tower Light video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jh618...

תגובות: 2 113

  • We both really enjoy your videos, and they have been a huge inspiration for us. Actually, almost two years ago, we decided to make your LED mushrooms, and that was what snowballed into our own channel. Your video and content quality leaves very little to be desired. If we ever create videos half as good as yours, I'll consider the ILaward project a success. Thanks for all your videos, Matt! /Hansi

    • @Luke Iman lmao

    • WOAH both youtubers i like wowowowo

    • Wow, that's quite something! :) Thanks for the compliments.

  • DIY Perks in a nutshell: "So what we'll need is a thin sheet of aluminum"

    • and brass

    • @Jesse I respect that. Having said that though... Living in Southern Ontario all my life, I can promise you that we don't say 'caramel' that way. We do have carmel candies that are made from caramel. We say it the way it is spelt. With every single letter and not adding an extra tone into it. These are called regional accents. These are preferred social adjustments in the pronunciation. We also say aluminum the way it is properly spelt. Google "aluminium" and you will see it auto changes it to the correct dictionary spelling. You will also see that is is labeled as "noun, adjective British" when you search the term "aluminium" on www.dictionary.com . Aluminium is the spelling of the regional accented word. Not the authentic spelling of the word. These are not my opinions, these are facts I have acquired from education. It's only fun if you don't teach English.

    • @Jason R.C. its like any language... just how its said. For some reason US english omits the second i in aluminium, fair enough. But the way you guys say 'carmel' instead of how it is spelled 'caramel' is just as weird. extra r in drawing, omitting an a in caramel, thats what makes all the fun of accents :P

    • What about those drawrrrings? Can some one explain the extra "r" pronounced in "drawing" in UK English?

    • @Bryan Nichols Yeah, give us that goooood tease... Wait until like... 5 minutes in so we get that long wait before the gratification of a British man saying "aluminium".

  • You can see him getting progressively more blinded by the increasing light in the room.

    • @Alberto Figuerêdo Hehe you the man... ! 🤙

    • @Cyril Jude lmao I didn't think you'd reply 😂 I'm not familiar with this 'I' and 'L' thing in math though, I wondered if it was some sort of a light measurement but I thought liters would be just way better 🤣🤣

    • @Alberto Figuerêdo It's annoying to see you forgot basics of Math classes....! Difference between 'l' and 'L' is clear....! Figure it out...🤣

    • @Cyril Jude 23 liters of subscribers? dang that sure is a lot xD

    • 😂

  • For the LED ring to cement, try adding medium size cotton balls to act as clouds, the light shines nicely through them.

  • My dad made a standup lamp recently after he got the idea from the 2nd light you made here. He rolled the led strip, spiraling downwards around a aluminum tube, wrapped those sheets into tubes, using a few bicycle spokes at the top to hold them up and infront of the LED's. It looks pretty damn awesome

  • Awesome project yet again, Matt, you are always an endless inspiration to us fellow creative people (and all those who just enjoy watching because of your quality content). I thought about how it would be to create the first project in this video, but use UV lighting instead and let it shine down on all white pebbles - sort of creating a night-time "bioluminescent pebble beach" effect. Not so much a working light, as a mood light of some sort. Well, long story short, as said you are an inspiration, keep up the great work! :) - Greetings from Denmark

  • I love the way you brought this together! I have spent many years supplying and advising customers on LED lighting application. These DIY options are fantastic and I will be using this to illuminate my garage. I'd love to share when I complete it. Thanks for the great ideas!

  • I'm almost done building the first project ! Great idea , the shadowless lighting is huge for me and the high CRI I love, wish it were brighter even though I doubled the run of leds on the arc, I also used cylindrical molds for space efficiency and used and Xt-60 connector for the power and I made a wood top instead of the rocks . Wish the leds were more tightly spaced it would be awesome considering the built in heat sink of the project

    • What about attaching another strip next to the first one but with the LEDs themselves staggered?

  • Thank you for sharing Matt. Although I don’t craft with aluminum there were some good conceptual tips I picked up in this video that I’m planning to try in my own tinkering projects. Hoping to see more of your inspirational ideas.

  • To connect positive and negative at opposite ends(as in the last project) is very good practice since it prevents voltage drop along the strip. Especially if you are creating a circle of led strip(no edge with a strong and weak side). Also very nice to hear someone who knows what they are talking about when it comes to LEDs

  • Love the video! I've been experimenting with a bunch of different LED projects myself, and found that you can save some "elbow grease" by using clear Leak Seal spray instead of sanding the shade to get the frosted effect. Sanding took over a half hour, spraying Leak Seal took two minutes (1 minute to shake the van and 1 minute to spray the sheets 😁)

  • These will be definitely done at some point in my house. Amazing ideas. And thanks for pointing out the importance of good quality LEDs! That is the most important aspect of using LEDs as actual room light instead of pure decoration.

  • Hey nice video! I built something quiet similar some years ago. I built a wooden arc from plywood and countersink the LED stripe in it. To fix it onto my table I used small aluminium clamps and gave the ply wood some layers of painting that let it look like real wood. :) Now having seen your video and your Concrete Audio Nob I see how I can improve my version of the light quiet a bit ;)

  • Great video, very creative and cool techniques! Thanks for listing the products used. What thickness of aluminum do you prefer, please? Maybe bend the ends of the aluminum strip over to help prevent pulling out. As mentioned, LED strips need cooling (which the aluminum strip helps to provide here), heat shortens their life. The traces on LED strips are very light-weight, causing the LEDs farther away from the power entry to be much dimmer. Additional wires can be added, soldered to the strip in a few places, to prevent this. Not sure how to make the additional wires look good though. Beware cheap import power supplies, many of them don't have proper safety isolation from the AC power line. BigCliveDotCom (no connection to me) has some videos of the details.

  • I really like this tutorial format where we don't actually know what you're making until you're done making it. It's almost refreshing.

  • You have created some amazing projects. Can’t wait for the next ones. Love the the RGB crystal tower.

  • The wall mounted light looks good. I suppose you could always use colour changing LED to give a mood effect. 3rd one looks like a homemade SAD light.

  • These are so inspiring - although I am concerned about the safety issues mentioned in the comments by an electrician. A supply list posted in the description or in the first frame would be really helpful (unless I'm missing it, I didn't see one.)

  • Great ideas with style! Thanks!! Regarding the wall lights, cut one acrylic sheet 1/2 inch narrower and make it the outer sheet of the shade. This creates a 1/4 inch light border on the top and bottom, also giving the shade a dimensional effect.

  • DIY Perks - question for you - LED's can degrade over time. High quality LED's are made to last. How have these LED's held up over time? I know you did a CRI test on some of these high quality types of LED's. How have they held up for you over time? Can you test them now, and compare them to how they were when you first made them? Brightness wise, how have they stood up? Thanks

  • this guy makes me feel like i can do anything. literally had no clue why i was so into taking electronics apart, after subbing, i now know why. keep up the amazing work

  • Just a suggestion for future videos, you might want to let people know that you can use wood tools on aluminum because of the metals softness, just so people don't spend needlessly. Thanks for making incredible free content!

  • Hey Matt, What is the thickness of aluminium sheet you used? Also is it anodised or bare aluminium sheet? BTW, Very nice videos. I like DIY and been subscribed to your channel for a very long time.

  • 1 Strip uses about 1.2 Amps or about a third of the energy of your typical CFL at same brightness. Thank you for sharing your wonderful projects.

  • So fun, excited to try the first and third project! Definitely would be super useful as a student in a dark studio!

  • Very nice projects! I consider making the 2nd one by myself. Do you have any sketches or dimensions of any parts? Because that's the only complain I have about your videos: not giving any detail of the dimensions of the material you use. I understand that therefore you can scale it as you like, but as a reference I wish to have more detail. Thanks for the video anyway! It's very awesome.

  • 5:34, I've used this kind of switches earlier and even using them 12V 1A Load, they get surprisingly hot and create a voltage drop of 3V to 4V. It might be a case of a defective switch, but I recommend using Relay, whose coils are switched by that switch.

  • This dude makes fantastic DIYOYGYED: Do It Yourself Once You Get Your Engineers Degree.

    • You're WAY over complicating this.

    • @Flyde yes, it *is* a joke

    • LOL "DIYOYGYED" should be a real series

    • @Jay H Colin Furze videos are not diy, just like the Hacksmith they are more like hey look how crazy we are😂

    • I'm three years away from that

  • Hello Matt, With instructions shown for your table lamp over an aluminium strip, I used the electrical wire casing and fixed it on the table edge in shape of an inverted U and pasted the strips inside it. Not as elegant as yours but does create very good lighting for my desk work. Thank you for inspiration. Abhishek Chatterjee

  • These projects were very cool, and seem easy to replicate!

  • Dude, your projects are amazing. Very glad you decided to share you talent with us all!

  • I like how he makes it so simple. Even though I’m never gonna make it. Love it😂

  • I love your projects. But I would like to see a lot without wood and aluminum, since honestly I am not good at handling these. Maybe you could do a summary of some projects that don't require these? I would appreciate it.

  • Instead of using the scuffed-up acetate I have used Yupo Paper, a type of synthetic vellum surface which is used by artists. It comes in opaque white and translucent, is just as durable as any acetate, and is fairly rigid without being very thick. You can find it at better art stores like Blick or Jerry's Art O Rama.

    • Since it takes paint very well it becomes a great color gel, light can go through acrylic paint or even "faux stained glass" paint on the Yupo surface.

    • Silent-Active great idea

  • couldnt you use the sheets from the tv screens for these projects like for the first one make a tube from the sheets to encase the LED's mounted on the aluminum strip? Just discovered your channel today and i seriously love your vids!!! I have dismantled broken tv and monitor screens and wanted to use those sheets but reallly had no idea how to do that (yes i watched your daylight panel vid ) absolute genius!!!!

  • Amazing projects... Definitely going to my to do list. Thank you so much

  • Awesome projects, Matt! Could you specify the thickness of the aluminum used in first project, along with dimensions? Thanks.

    • 3inch thick aluminum

  • I'm going to undertake the first of these projects but I have a couple of questions. How do you fix the aluminum bar into the wet concrete without sliding out of the case? Would it be possible to use epoxi instead of concrete with some stones inside the mold? What do you think?

  • Hey Matt! Great video as always. In the LED strip infos it's suggested to utilize a 10A to 15A dimmer circuit. I see you're using a standard 5A. I'm guessing that the manufacturer suggests such a current regulation so that if the voltage regulator isn't up to task the strips don't receive less current than needed. Are there any indication of this being true? If so would it be detrimental to the strips' health to utilize a 5A dimmer circuit? Would love to hear your input on this matter. Also I'm planning on lay down an extent of 10 meters of strips (two rolls basically) would that influence this matter at all? Thanks, Dave

    • penus glottus In my experience you need to have each 5 metre length connected via high quality copper wire otherwise the voltage drop by the end of the second strip causes a noticeable and progressing dimming the further away from the power source the leds get. Make sure that the dimmer you’re using is for D.C. 12 volt applications. A household light dimmer will not work for this. The cheapest way to power them is with a second hand ATX Computer power supply from EBay. A 500w variant should be able to deliver up to 25 Amps continuously.

  • Thanks, those are great ideas! Love the tip about the acetate sheets for diffuser. I'm always looking for good diffusers :)

  • For better and bigger alternative to acetate sheet is any broken LCD old TV, they usually have 3 to 4 frosted sheet inside up to the TV size.

  • Another idea for difusing the light on wall lights is to use white nylon stockings streched over iron wires and then, hardened with a layer or two of resin. That allows to shape the difusing surface in various 3D shapes and play with the design.

  • Really good ideas. Thanks Mat. Another interesting and inventive video.

  • One suggestion for the first project is to use some glow-in-the-dark garden stones (I managed to find some in a local dollar store) for some of the stones to give you something to find each end in the dark.

    • I put glow in the dark paint on my flashlights to help me find them in the dark. It works great as I use the better 2nd gen gid paint.

    • Or you could simply paint the stones with glow-in-the-dark paint. I get mine from GLOW Inc in different colors...even use one special paint they have for the sights on handguns!

  • Matt you have done it again ... Would we expect anything less from you ? HELL NO. Love these lights .

  • just got a cool idea watching your video - I have used the aluminium c channel before for lighting in van setups - as it hides the led strip in most situations when viewing the light. The idea is 2 x c channel, facing each other, and in the middle bettween them is aluminium angle - placed downward such that each c channel light reflects off of it and outward to the viewer. Thanks for all of your awesome diy videos.

  • please don't ever stop making videos and giving ideas like these ! amazing work !

  • Thanks Matt, you make me feel that even I might be able to make these. I hope you've got a patent on some of your ideas, you'll know which ones are worth it and worth chatting to dragons about lol.Blessings

    • You don't patent videos. If anything, it would be copyrighted.

  • The one with the crumply aluminium foil actually does look a lot like a frosted glass window. It's really quite nice looking. Very cool!

  • You sir are a legend, your sanding of the plastic sheets gave me a great idea to solve a problem where I can't find some frosted polycarbonate panels for a project...Im just going to buy clear ones now and sand them until they are frosted..Thanks, Ive got a few ideas from your channel now :)

  • The last one would be great mounted to a ceiling. I'm glad you are making more videos again!

    • Same thought. Sized to match my ceiling tiles. This is the solution I've needed for a house that I've just purchased (yep, January 2020 I bought a house) florescent tubes/ballast, I'm not a qualified electrician but, I can build a computer. This is going to be great!

    • Same thought. Sized to match my ceiling tiles. This is the solution I've needed for a house that I've just purchased (yep, January 2020 I bought a house) florescent tubes/ballast, I'm not a qualified electrician but, I can build a computer. This is going to be great!

  • Can you tell us the thickness of the aluminum sheeting you used for the first project? Also, the wires used to solder on to the dimmer switches?

  • Hey Matt, I love the video, so much in fact that I made one of the first projects in this video myself. But I have a problem. I created this build, and it's been working amazingly! But just today (about 3 days after completing the project) the led's aren't dimming anymore. When I turn the dimmer dial, it just goes straight to full power. Is there something I can do? I bought a second hand DC 2 Amp power adapter. Could that be the problem? Do I need more power? Or maybe it's just faulty? Please if you could get back to me that would be awesome. Thanks!

    • DIY Perks I bought a pack of three dimmers, so no problems there. I wrapped the whole thing in electrical tape pretty much air tight, and it's just started to happen a few hours ago. I guess I'll just retry the build and try making the weighted feet out of something where I can get into the components. Thanks so much for getting back to me so quick. Love all your videos man, and this was the first I've tried recreating. I'm just always nervous about working with wiring, soldering and circuit boards. 🙃

    • Sounds like there's something up with the potentiometer. If possible, try giving it a clean, though that'll be a bit tricky if it's in the cement!

  • You can also get light diffuser sheets from inside laptop screens :) Nice work.

  • I really enjoy your projects, I wish you could make simple book light with LED. thanks for the great content.

  • Some great tips here.. I'm getting set to build smart lamps with RGB+CCT strips and the info on making aluminum strips and diffusers is super helpful

  • For me, a high PWM frequency >3kHz is much more important than a high CRI. The flickering of regular lights annoys me quite a lot. Variable voltage is the king for LED dimming though

  • Ok.. Wow... Love these... The second option I see so so so useful for setting up a ILaward background/space... Was thinking something else as plates... But the Aluminium is really good for the reason you stated.. I see myself doing that second option in the future... Sanding can be don with an electric sanding machine or so... Awesome

  • Thanks for an interesting video which I enjoyed learning from. Can you tell me what is the life of LED strip in your experience. The reason I ask is that I want to embed some LED strip in a piece of furniture covered with a glass panel, and once in it will not be accessible so it is important that the LEDs have a decent life span. Many thanks.

  • It really depends what you want to do with the leds. If I was just making that arch light to put on a desk or table or display, I wouldn't be worried in the least about color quality and even the cheapest led strips would suffice. For $15, I had a decent 15 foot RGBWW strip with the controller. I'd really only spring for more expensive leds to ensure that I get ones that look like daylight if my project were for something like an indoor garden or something. Otherwise, there's really no need to spend more. Knowing they might dim over time, I would buy extra of the cheap ones so I could replace them if needed, but for the most part, the cheap ones and the expensive ones come from the same manufacturers and just get branded and priced differently. They seem to have pretty much the same life span. I mean it's physically the exact same leds and the exact same resistors so nothing about the strips themselves are different unless you get a type with different leds.

  • OMG. After two and a half MILLION views, I guess you don't need me to tell you how fabulous these ideas are...but... MAN, they're FABULOUS! Thanks so much for making this! Cheers. :)

  • Perfect timing for this ideas, you solved some of my design problems I had, thank you very very much :)

  • Hi Matt, Another great video. Just a quick question.....what thickness aluminium did you use?

  • I think these lighting ideas are simply amazing, the trifecta of DIY LED lighting.

  • God, because of you, everything in my future home will probably be DIY rather than store bought :,)

  • Matt, your video's are amazing. You just earned yourself a new subscriber!! Keep up the nice work, bro (:

    • When I tried to read this comment, I had to read it several times; because even though it says what it says, my brain just kept projecting the word "suicide". I don't know why!?!?! I don't claim to be a psychic or to have any abilities in that kinda stuff. It was just weird. Or mebbe I am weird!!! Anyway... I tried to ignore it, but I couldn't. So, I decided to share it. I hope you and yours are OK. Make sure to hug everyone and let them know that they are loved.....even if they are batshit CRAZY ( bcuz you drove them to it [just kidding, geesh, relax Beverly{I don't know who Bev is, it's just the first name that popped into my head}]).? Anyway.... Hope I am just batshit CRAZY cuz that was trippy!!!

  • I really like the last one. That would be perfect as a video light emulating window light

  • Incredible. Subscribed. I might actually try that 3rd one. Looks awesome.

  • that last one would be incredible as a way to block heat from windows in the summer while still having the light. if it was insulated and made to fit in the window jam it would block the heat and light coming through the window for a dark entertainment room and switched on for "natural" style lighting.

  • Awesome, I loved all the three projects.

  • Enjoyed the video,very informative. I would like to know what sort of lighting is used to shoot the videos. Just started a work-at-home job requiring excellent lighting for Skyping, and wonder if the first project described would be sufficient to the job, rather than having floodlights pouring into my eyes?

    • +Kristie Grubb absolutely!

  • I used led strips from Amazon for under cabinet lighting in the kitchen of my house. Found 2700hz was the best color temp, nice warm light. Used the adhesive to tack them into place and came back with staple gun to finish the mounting to the cabinets.

    • Bastian Springer You never know. Perhaps Ethan can listen to the light.

    • 2700K (Kelvin)*

  • Hey Matt I love your channel! I was wondering which UK power supply you would recommend for the led lights you used on the last project I was considering trying to create an almost flush mounted ceiling light using a 5 metre roll of leds I'm creating a VR room with my Oculus Rift and as I'm 6.4 tall so I wanna have lighting for the room without taking up space I can't use recessed lighting because my water tank is above the room I'm trying to light.

    • DIY Perks Thanks Matt!

    • A 12v 6A power adapter should do the trick! Or, if you want the LEDs to last longer you could use a 19v laptop adapter and power the LEDs with it with two strips in series (so they get 9.5v each).

  • Estimated maximum power consumption for the lights: Strip work light - 1.6m, 100 LEDs: 20W/1.6A (equivalent to 100-150W incandescent) Small wall light - 0.5m, 30 LEDs: 6W/0.5A (equivalent to 30-50W incandescent) Window sized light - 5m, 300 LEDs: 60W/5A (equivalent to 300-500W incandescent) Have i made a mistake somewhere?

  • I might do that second one and make all of the lights in the room based on it, with rgb LEDs of course... Looks really neat.

  • It would be interesting to see what each of these lighting projects do to a otherwise completely dark room. The lighting shown here is a tradeoff for the needs of a quality video, as this one. I won't be able to tell if these color strips have a orange or blue tint to it because of these external sources for example. There is an external light at ilaward.info/the/wyd-w/uWmn25h51ai8oWU casting a shadow on the aluminum bars. There is an glaring external light on the left side at ilaward.info/the/wyd-w/uWmn25h51ai8oWU . So I'm not sure the lighting effect of the project is as powerful as shown.

  • Brilliant video. I have a spare roll of these lying around, and fancied doing something like this.

  • What thickness of aluminum (or aluminium) did you use for the arch in the first project? I want to make something similarly bendable.

  • Hey, Matt. I got a project for you. Bluetooth LED lights, with an option of having more than just 1, say four for example. That can all be turn on with your phone or something, and are powered with AA batteries, and for added pizzazz, an led charge indicator, like the one from your wireless tv video

  • Amazing job! Very innovating! :)