Building a homemade 'wallpaper TV'

פורסם בתאריך 6 מרץ 2018
In this video I attempt to build a home-made 'wallpaper TV' on a shoestring budget, and the result is surprisingly good!
More info on the framerate thingy: paulbakaus.com/tutorials/perf...
UFO motion tests are from BlurBusters.com and the video shown on screen is from the amazing scenery video 'Patagonia 8k'

תגובות: 3 163

  • Damn. I want him to recreate this project nowadays. His build quality and technical know-how has skyrocketed since. He'll probably end up making a TV that's invisible altogether when switched off

    • I’d like to see it redone now as well

    • Yeah, I was not impressed with this at all.

    • @No Madmann no one has a black wall in their home. Even so called haunted homes have very good color paint on it

    • he ended up building a super bright water-cooled tv for outdoor --- 2021--- and it's amazing

    • Just paint your wall black

  • Samsung worker: “but sir we are doing the best we can” Samsung CEO: “This man was able to build a smart wall in a cave, with a box of scraps!”

  • So the solution isn't making the TV thinner, it's making the walls thicker

    • for me! the most interesting part is how he solve the flicker problem, very clever

    • i built a wooden suitcase with a pc in it once, and used the same technique. i tore apart a monitor and just integrated its internals into the suitcase and put a pc there as well. it looked really cool, and was probably the smallest full spec pc you could ever find. it was only 12cm thickness while being the exact size of a monitor screen

    • I have the same thing, but it's a 3" reflecting telescope. The eyepiece is mounted flush with the wall (but the wall is 10 feet thick) Great video!

    • This came just up my mind: "I can walk through walls!" "Impossible, stupid." "I make doors."

  • The reason he is so subscribed is because of the quality of his videos and the efficient way he communicates. This is the sweet spot for many makers like me that really appreciate the last mile shown to us and don't suffer long windedness for the sake of analytics. Plus, he just has really cool projects. YT is stratefying in layers, with content makers like this at the top, being justly rewarded with likes and subs.

  • Flat screens generate a great deal of heat. That's why the manufacturer designs cooling vents in the back panel. How do you allow for the venting of heat from the panel and boards?

  • Just wanted to let you know how much i appreciate your in depth videos and how much effort and work you put into them. They are both entertaining and educating. Keep the great work up. Thanks.

  • One of the rarest kind of channel, that I found on ILaward. I can't ignore even a single video from this channel. Great work 👌🏼

  • Great job. I just imagine how easier the entire endeavour is gonna be with recent OLED TVs, which have no backlighting at all and are much thinner, and do produce true blacks. Also, OLED TVs have very little heat production and longer MTBF than LCD TVs, where the bscklight power supply is the first section to fail. Thanks for the great video.

  • The whole dimmer thing was insane. You know some crazy stuff.

    • @Michal Kvak I was wondering how all this flickering might affect your eyes, and if that's why manufacturers didn't already do it.

    • @Michal Kvak You're thinking about it wrong.. Your pupil will just stay constricted if the image is bright even if it's strobed. You won't hurt your eyes anyways unless the light is bright enough initially to burn/wear your eye

    • Yeah overall it is a cool idea to put black frames in-between real ones, but it has some health hazards. U know how when u turn on light your pupil changes so less light hits receptors in your eyes? Now imagine watching a 60fps video u can't see black frames 'cos brain sort of filters them but your eyes are still trying to adapt to light 120x per second. Way it is different from blinking is that when you blink you become momentarily blind but that's a different story. So it's cool but don't do that for your own eyes benefit.

    • @Dave Katague ok ,, Lol tho

  • It seems like it would be a lot easier to cut a hole in the drywall, frame a support box inside, mount the TV in the wall, and re-apply drywall and paint. You could even add some cooling fans/vents inside the wall. Or...just buy a flush-mount TV.

  • That dimmer seems like something Captain Disillusion would absolutely LOVE! That is right up his chrome stained alley! You should do a collab, or just get in contact with him. He works in the digital world, but he loves stuff like that dimmer and absolutely adores experimentation and outside the box thinking. I'm sure you two would get on great! I'm extremely curious to see what that looks like in person, perhaps someone could make a digital version using software to mimic it that people could view. I hate that "soap opera effect" and never knew what caused it or why my brothers TV looks like a crappy soap opera. Now I know.

  • Now what would be interesting would be to integrate a solar tube from the roof to just the LCD part of the screen (super thin) and then back light it with outside light AND use a video camera to view the outside. In fact, by using a Raspberry PI, you could augment the view to crop or scale it to what you want to see (alternate view depending on button presses, wi-fi remote, etc.) to other views of security camera feeds and weather forecast or what have you. But the real function would be to get some UV light, real light, and a real view of the outside. That way the room would actually get brighter, the view of the outside would be there and you could frame it like a window. But you'd have all the options of a "Back to the Future II window screen" (hopefully without all the flicker Marty's family had!)

  • I very much enjoy "off the wall" ideas and projects - and I have done this project with a few minor changes. Not looking to save space, I used standoff pillars to allow airflow between the tv and wall, and rather than covering the circuitry with fiber board I used plexiglass to allow people to see "whats inside"

  • As cool as this project was, I found myself more impressed by him explaining the flashing frames and persistence of vision :D

  • Pretty cool! I would cover the speakers though even IF it was with speaker speaker material. Saying that I wonder if one could buy a simple cotton material of similar color to the wall color and stretch firm over the speaker openings to camouflage those better? Also the information on the backlight flicker process, I think, helped answer a long standing question for me. I always wondered why when filming with tape style camcorders and even some digital cameras, why the screens of computers and flat screen TVs seem to flicker in the recording. IF I am correct it would be because of the stills being played in succession and/or the back light being used.

  • My dad did something similar with a CRT TV from the 80s. He cut a hole in the wall, on the other side of which happened to be a kitchen pantry, and he put the TV on the top shelf, then framed it with stained baseboard molding. Turned a 2-foot deep 70lb monster into a 'flatscreen', albeit at the expense of some kitchen storage 😄

    • Lol we did the same thing, also protruding into the kitchen pantry! Canned goods had to go elsewhere.

  • Matt, you're a genius! Excellent work! And you're a very good presenter as well

  • I have watched quite a few of your videos over the last week and have to say I find them amazing. I would not have the balls or skills to even attempt to tackle a job like you did here or the many other projects you have done. The computer Desktop you built by the way was amazing and in all honesty not even that chap Linus I see on the tube could build something as good as that either. I take my hat off to you sir. This gets a BIG like from me and the subscribe button just had to be hit so I can see some more of your amazing work.

  • Personally I think covering those boxes in the lower left with something, and adding a mesh over the speakers would make this a lot better looking. Otherwise, great job! :)

    • Hierophant or integrate a decorative panel that doesn't look out of place, it's a good idea if you're looking for the aesthetic but his implementation is more of a prototype and very utilitarian

    • Cover them with a... really high coffee table or something, I'd guess?

  • This project is great, I just have one question- the original TV set case has breathing holes for passive ventilation, hope your upgraded version does not suffer overheating because of lack of ventilation (?)

  • He basically made his own black frame insertion (BFI) feature! that's pretty cool that being said most mid-highend TVs made post 2010 should have this feature built in to the TV (they all typically call it something else other than BFI) The additional benefit of his custom solution is to modify the BFI based on 24, 30, 60Hz - that's probably rare outside of the current OLED crop of TVs. As an example of how cool/high-end this feature is - this type of variable refresh rate is only available on the new high end MacBook Pro and Apple Pro Display XDR both of which cost thousands of dollars great job on this! now obviously this could have adverse affects on the backlight because it may not be built to handle these custom refresh rates but I think for an older TV well outside of its warranty you can take this gamble relatively safely

  • Firstly I must congratulate you on your very clear diction - it makes your presentations a joy to listen to and engenders interest in the subject matter. Depending on the size of your room, one could also make the false wall a little thicker so that the externally mounted circuit boards were flush with the TV. It would also be fun to have electronically operated curtains to cover the TV - and then somehow link in the on/off switch for the TV to open the curtains a few seconds before the TV came on :-)

  • Your imagination, curiosity and creativity are so inspiring, thanks for your great work!

  • excellent. the finish is up us I think. the wall could be a panel of walnut and the speakers routed out to a shallow horn. could also be combined with a horn speaker wall - coiled horn, or a transmission line type speak fore real seismic base - and no big box in the room.

  • You could have gone without the speaker holes and just went with another alternative for the speakers all together.

    • agreed, he doesn't appear to be an audiophile.

    • a store bought soundbar probably does the job. or just covering those speakers with a black mesh fabric, or maybe even wall coloured fabric

    • TRICKSTA 😂🤣

    • @Sultan Mehmood Ghaznavi Yes... something in a glass was smoked before this comment for sure.

    • I can cut holes in glass and place nice fancy car speakers.by covering whole wall with smoked black glass

  • EXTREMLY WELL DONE!!!! PERFECT EXPLANATION STEP BY STEP DEMONSTRATION! THANK YOU VERY MUCH!!!!

  • That mod you did to the tv looks awesome, I'd assume it would work very well for gaming especially first person shooters.

  • Excellent idea; I also dislike my protruding telly, and will definitely study on my options for a similar solution. That said, you really need to add venting holes at the top and bottom of the fake wall, as that screen will seriously heat up in an enclosed space. Also, mounting those boards onto fibreboard -- especially the powerboard -- is asking for a house fire; mounting them with standoffs to at least a metal plate (either connected to system common, or maybe earthed) will probably be your safest bet. Finally, you should have checked where the transformer board for the backlight is (generally found as tiny-but-dense transformers along the edge of the screen panel), as those things put out 400VAC to the cathode lights; if they're up against the fibreboard, then the firehazard is much greater.

    • My thoughts exactly... Lol

    • No ventilation so the electronics (and maybe the screen) will fail early. Although fans seem like a good idea, they introduce noise, require power, a dust filter, and won't last forever. So I recommend large (discreet) holes or slots at top and bottom. Or bash holes through into the chimney breast at top and bottom. (Hot air rises from bottom to top. It doesn't flow sideways without fan assistance.)

    • Good Lord, that was a very boorish thing to Say. I get the feeling your are unerringly conventional, and live in a very small box which you have constructed for yourself.

    • Yeaaaa, no. This definitely will not generate enough heat to catch anything on fire.

    • That’s definitely an LED backlight, CCFL would have a special better-insulted cable to carry the high voltage, and it isn’t there.

  • Let me just say it looks amazing! If you don’t mind just a bit of constructive criticism you really should consider some sort of finishing edge around those speakers. Doesn’t seem to me like it would be such a big deal considering all of the trouble you went through in the first place. Great job!

  • Depending on how the wall is, i would've just left the TV on the bracket and built a drywall from side to side with cut outs. I'm also a electrician so the electrical side of moving it out of the original wall wouldn't bother me.

  • The sync. dimmer function is quite clever! I'd like to see it as another feature of all new displays on earth!

  • Great job. I love how you took the boards out from the tv and placed them elsewhere. HOWEVER, I Think at the end of the day you could of kept a manufacturers warranty on a much better television by building a wall around the television as all you ended up with here was building a wall around a television. Only way this works better is if the tv has straight out inputs but TV's don't these days so you could achieve exactly same thing by building the front fibre wall around the tv but do it to newer tv without taking it apart. You do solve a problem of the tv leani g forward but if you're going to build a wall around it to solve your problem you may as well just build a wall around the entire tv and have every single Input plugged in with the correct lead into the tv and have a compartment that the other end can be left hanging elsewhere for when you need them by adding an extension to them without ever needing to get to back of tv again.

  • The unpainted speaker hole edges would break me

    • The inside of the tv frame edge is also not painted

    • I was about to comment the same thing. Not only that, but the speakers themselves look so ugly.

  • Hi, your videos are very inspiring. I've been trying to build a glass concelaed blind system. Can you do a video on it?

  • Awesome content so I subbed!! I think it would have been easier to cut into the sheetrock and trim back the studs though. Alternatively, one could build a fabric wall and hide the speakers and other items behind. Different tastes I guess. Fun watch!

  • Incredible experiment with the perceived motion. Well done

  • I just love watching ur videos man, always educative, always inspiring n at times mind boggling,lol,awesome work bruv

  • My first initial was heat dissipation, after watching the video LED TV's dont generate much heat to start melt down compared to old plasma TVs. Great idea by the way.

  • Are there any issues with overheating because of lack of airflow?

    • @Doge33 It's not in the actual wall, it's in a fake wall on the outside. If a pipe breaks it's still behind the real wall and not the fake one. No different then if you had a tv mounted on your actual wall like most people do. This set up makes no difference if a water pipe breaks. Besides the water pipe comment the fire hazard is definitely an issue.

    • @Doge33 That was my thought... would have loved a Big Clive colab here

    • @Doge33 If a water pipe breaks near your TV you're fucked either way. Water + electronics = death.

    • The damn thing has high risks of catching fire. Electricity , wood and flammable paint are not great together. And if a water pipe breaks say goodbye to the whole setup. Not a good idea

  • A wonderful idea. I wonder, if it would be better by placing all the internal elements of the TV in frames, of different sizes, but similar in appearance, like those of Ikea. And join the small frames to the edges of the larger frame that contains the screen, in the form of a collage, placing photos on all. I'll try.

  • So clever! Love the way he stripped down the set and removed boards.... crazy smart.

  • Hey everyone, apologies for the long absence! I have a very good reason for it, which you'll see in the next video. Meanwhile, I thought I'd get this one out to you guys for something to watch. I know it's not as polished as my usual stuff, but it was with its own constraints so it is what it is. Not getting lazy or anything... hehe. The next video just needs editing, so stay tuned - should turn a few heads!

    • Were there any cooling issues that needed addressing?

    • I think with your great electronics knowledge and the very good CRI of Yuji LED's. It would be an interesting project to with an Epson or BenQ projector make it into a LED projector? All that would be needed is the led with lens or reflector, watercooling, and find the cable that finds the lamp check command.. Hope you will find the time!

    • DIY Perks July to be a Insulated Garden Roomqqsssgghjj

    • Can you please show more about how to connect this pulse controller Thanks

    • @Damn You're Garbage 4 or 6 monitors seemlessly together at the price he bought it for haha, that would be awesome for your own cinema room 😁👍

  • So, I am 2 minutes into the 2nd video I have watched on your channel and I am now a subscriber. You are a fantastically smart and and informative person thank you for the great content you are producing.

  • I'm amazed that you can buy an off the shelf pulse width modulator! In the old days, (not that long ago) this would have been a scratch build!

  • While the housing could use some finesse, that was awesome about the frame rate mod. I'm the guy when it comes to working with wood, I need to learn more about the low voltage stuff - I really enjoy learning about it. Cheers!

  • I think it's great engenuety and innovating. Congratulations for your abilities. How ever, giving the results can be acquired in this case by 2 other options: #1, purchase the latest technology which already meets this requirement. #2, cut the sheet-rock wall material; expose the wall structure, accommodate simple additional supports, sink in your equipment into the wall, replace sheetrock accommodating the display,make sure to allow some discrete ventilation, and mission accomplished.😁👍

  • Thermal issues? The set has vents for this very reason and whilst some of the heat from the display can be radiated out of the front, the logic boards et al behind the wood aren't going to have the same luxury. Did you put in heat vents that we didn't see?

  • I enjoyed your video a lot. Especially the overriding the brightness! Great job and I am about to make it in my home. Thank you!!!

  • looking at the way the other components of the tv where mounted, gives me an idea to do that for repeaters and hubs around the house, even mounting behind some picture frames, to make old houses, smart houses too, with sensors (motion, temperature, gas),

  • looks amazing, i didnt know there was so much empty space in the tv case !!!

  • I had a 48" rear projection TV. I cut a hole in the wall so the front was flush with the wall. The back of the TV protruded into the garage.

    • Plot twist: It was a detached garage too.

    • I also tried doing that, but the back protruded in to my neighbors flat.

    • Every time he used the garage remote it changed the channel on the tv 😊😊

    • There are pics out there of a bloke who did this, but into a spare room, however his planning sucked as the back of the TV interfered with the room's door.......

    • Lmfao

  • It was wise of you to start off the project with a good quality TV, a SONY. Excellent work as usual... too marks Matt.

  • Muito bonito mesmo, mas sem ventilação adequada o perigo de esquentar e danificar os componentes é grande! Fica a dica

  • The only thing missing I would have connected a temperature reading and a fan or use one of those thermo chip which they use on mini wine coolers and mini fans , just to be on a safe side .great idea over all love it..

  • What you achieved is truly amazing. Thanks for the awesome video!

  • This is perfect! Really goes well with a minimalist design style! Also im blown away by how you can just take apart electronics and make them fit your vision! Brilliant!

  • Damn, why didn't I get this kind of an idea...You are really creative with vivid imagination and I would love to see more.

  • do you think it would be possible to detect the incoming video signal, get the frame rate, and then have the TV's refresh rate set to match?

  • As interesting as this video is, and honestly, impressive, and especially somebody actually buying a tv and then pulling it apart, there's a not too minor issue here. Yes, Your original example, with the TV hanging out above the fireplace, hangs out - and therefor is 'standing out' for a variety of reasons: FIRST AND FOREMOST, because it's angled down so you can actually properly look at the TV from sitting down on the couch. It's fun and all that in your video you make a 'flush' mount TV, but that flush mounted TV also is completely verticly angled, so you'd have to STAND to properly watch it from above the fireplace. And because you need to angle it above your fireplace, the cables at the back taking up space don't matter as you'll have it angled anyway. Now if we were indeed looking at an example outside of the one above the fireplace, and we'd want the TV against the wall as flush as possible, sure, it's an interesting project, which i really do like, and why clearly i'll thumb up this video. BUT, even then, you run into the following thing: you want your TV 'flush' mounted against the wall then, and NOT placed on top of designer TV furniture, if you have one, and essentially, making your TV furniture redundant. Even if one were to argue that wouldn't really be a problem anyway, and really, it isnt, then there are some other issues to deal with: Generally, your house interior has been designed in a certain way. Drywall, poster wall, wall boards, etc. For example, if you have a clean white wall, with TV stand furniture, some lights on top of that, and some picture frames against the wall, like most people do nowadays, then if you 'flush mount' your TV the way this video portrays, you are going to have a bulky object against your wall, which is going to stand out like a sore thumb. Meaning that for this to ACTUALLY be flush mounted, and not stick out, you'll STILL need to dig into the wall about an inch or two thick into the wall, which is impractical to say the least, and would only be reasonable for a home renovation project with this purposefully done. That however would completely throw the idea of 'shoestring budget styling' out the window. AND, i don't think most people are as handy as you are NOR willing to throw away andy warranty on the TV that is void the moment you undo a screw.

  • Amazing job I’ve always wanted to do this myself but now that I’m out of a job due to covid I’m not comfortable taking apart my tv

  • I took a easier way out and got me a projector. Super flat on my wall can't even feel it. 😂 Great project really nice

    • @Ali 😁nahh its ok at least you understand now, research changes and sometimes wrong info is wide spread so its hard to keep up with the info or convince anyone otherwise

    • @Muhammad Ahmed i look stoopid now and i realise that lol currently in AFM egypt.. gonna learn all about it in a month time

    • @Ali im a little late, but i feel like you are going off a myth here, according to current research your eyes will be safe dont worry unless you know that you have a specific condition that affects you in that particular setting for some reason, i personally dont, limited knowledge :p

    • i was thinking of the same thing but with a mini projector palm size

    • @GLACIOUS13 See that's the one problem with a projector. It's fine for light use, but if you watch a lot of TV and try using a projector as your primary everyday TV, you'll wear it out fast. I learned that the hard way. Basically wore out a projector within about a year (the bulb still worked but the image was warped and full of blue/yellow spots).

  • Very well done I'm sure you had hard time to make old TV to work as new one. The new 8K Samsung TV cost over $11,000.00 for that crazy high price, in the end nice job you did.

  • Really impressive despite I have set up more than dozens of TVs in my career as radiomechanic.

  • I am dumbfounded on the light adjustment! This is a game changer to me! I can't believe most are bitching about the speakers and finish (you can all do it your way) when they are missing two incredible things....A flush wall mount, and an amazing way to see fluid motion in your viewing!

  • This man just ruined LG's years of work....

    • Well no he didn't because LG isn't going to start selling TV's that come with a free wall extension.

    • No, lmao not many people would pay for a TV to be put into their walls. That shit is expensive and you're fked when you want to upgrade lol. It literally takes no research and development to put a tv in a wall.

    • @Solematic i wouldn’t because i would be scared i break it

    • Sony, burrin

    • literally ruined LG's wallpaper TV sales

  • Great score on the used Sony TV! Most of the commenters missed the main point, that is, to make a wall-paper TV on a shoestring budget. In that you succeeded brilliantly. I would only try something like this if I can undo it later if it doesn't work out. Minus the few screw and wire access holes you got pretty close to that ideal as well, so great job!

  • Nicely done. Only one question. Should the spekers been covers with some thin fabric top protect it against dust?

  • I would have painted the trim bezel the blue color you used on the wood. I think it would flow better. Great video beyond that.

  • Almost perfect, although making the whole thing a tad thicker to properly cover the DVD etc would be better, and why didn't you finish the speakers? some metal 'gauze' painted the same colour and flushed in would finish it off Another option, put on a fake fireplace mantel so it looks like your original TV setup, and hide the DVD and video ports in there.

  • Nicely done. I put my tv behind a mirror, so its just a mirror until you turn it on. Doesn't work great in a bright room, needs it darker to work well, but it does work, really changes the living room completely not having a TV visible. The TV itself was embedded in the wall. Also, have you heard about projector TVs? lol, they are thin as nothing on the wall... lol

  • Really cool, I would make one more modification to cover the speakers with some kind of fabric grill/cover as they are somewhat unattractive.

    • Proper 5.1 or one of those little ones with 5 tweeters and a midrange driver used as a "subwoofer"?

    • I would have trashed the speakers and hooked that TV up to a proper sound system (sound bars are crap, go 5.1 or go home). I also don't understand why he'd use a DVD Player that connects via SCART, so watching a DVD with this setup you have shitty sound and shitty image quality as well...

    • Or remove completely and go with a sound bar or surround sound 🙈

    • if he was placing the fireplace mantle back in you could build the speakers in to that and paint the grills to match so you wouldnt even see the speakers

    • A metal grill or replace them with external speakers

  • I think it's a great idea, just a lot of extra work if you get a new TV lol. I probably would have purchased a cheap soundbar to replace those anemic looking speakers though. Otherwise great stuff!

  • Your channel is GOLDEN!!! I'm so glad I somehow found it. I love your content

  • I would really like to see you do a DIY digital photo frame project. Thanks in advance.

  • Yeah I did something like this once, I didn't have the TV unplugged when I took it apart. It wasn't until I went to remove the screen from the casing (when I grabbed the earthing) that I got a shock. I was obviously alright but it hurt more than a normal public electric fence (about the same as an electric fence kept on private land to keep horses in) definitely be more careful than me when doing this.

  • I must say... i understand that you were on a small budget but this really looks cheap to me. I do respect what you’re doing. And the fact that you could do it is amazing.

    • @no Painting end grain on OSB looks like shit no matter what colour you paint it.

    • Do you have a link?

    • I think he should have used the original bezel. Best solution?

    • If you think you have more skill, yours could look better. The idea is still good and useful for those who like it.

    • The wall should be covered in some nice textile

  • New type of satisfying content: watching him do cool DIY stuff with computers and TVs and stuff.

  • I liked the video and great tutorial, but the wall with uneven panels and cut out holes for speakers looked terrible.. plus the black tape as a frame looks so cheap... Perhaps an upgrade video is due.. think of it as PART 2. 👍

  • Pretty sure for the price paid for this fire hazard you could have just bought a quality projector and screen. Achieves the same end result without all the trapped heat inside that wall.

    • No, projectors aren’t remotely comparable - they are a different use case altogether

  • The black frame & clear border would have made an excellent modern picture frame for the TV Mount it on a recessed pull out TV mount All done Pull it out to reconnect any wires & then put it back You could use magnets to keep it flush w the wall I would have to make a cubby w a thin flush front for my Blue-Ray player, Apple TV, Roku, & Mac Mini