How to Make High Performance Sound Absorption Panels for $5

פורסם בתאריך 7 אוג 2016
In this video I explore the possibility of making DIY sound absorption panels on a budget, later comparing them to much more expensive acoustic foam. The results are pretty amazing!
There have been many comments pointing out that my test only measures transmission and not reflection, so is essentially unsuitable for my initial testing goal. While this is partly true, testing reflection is pretty difficult to do in a home environment, and the only way to do it that I can think of would be to spend a long time in the middle of a field with a powerful speaker and mic rig, which is really beyond the scope of what I was prepared to do for the video.
My tests are not rendered pointless however - it would do no good to have only measured reflection, as the thinnest lightest material would have won (like foam), as nothing would have bounced back. Reflection and transmission need to be tested together to measure how much sound passes through, and how much sound is reflected back - this should give an indication of how much sound is absorbed by a given material.
Regardless, only testing the transmission doesn't affect the outcome of the project at all, as any sound waves reflected by the panels themselves would have theoretically bounced off the wall anyway - again this is why reflection wasn't tested, as it doesn't matter so much for a panel setup (though would matter very much for a vocal booth).
Open to hear any thoughts about it though! Keep up the great discussion. :)

תגובות: 8 288

  • I do a lot of this kind of testing at RF frequencies and it would be easy to poke all kinds of holes in his testing methodology, but personally, i think he did a great job here. In fact, he actually DID do a reflection test when he hung them on the wall an listened. The bottom line is, he found a low cost method to improve the sound and the results speak for themselves. He's not trying to open a testing facility. He's just trying to find an inexpensive, easy way to improve his sound quality and I think he achieved that very nicely.

    • @Dragoro Oh wow. I couldn't really answer that. I'm sorry. Where I worked, first we were working at much higher frequencies and second, the test facility was provided by my employer. We used carbon impregnated foam that was specially shaped to handle the properties of the wave. If we wanted to try a different material, we would test it out by placing an antenna on each side and compare the signal level with and without foam. We would also do a reflection test by placing the foam against a reflective surface (metal) and transmit and receive. The foam is designed to attenuate the signal going in and then again when the signal is reflected and comes back out of the foam. The properties will be slightly different with incident angle. If you wish to set up a professional study, I can't imagine getting any kind of certification with towels. Acoustic tiles would be a must. Hope this helps. There's a lot more to it and people have whole careers setting up test facilities.

    • Its really cool to hear feedback like this. I want to ask how do you think the towel panel will hold up against 50 buck foam pannels? Is this a viable alternative, or just a cheap good solution (for a professional studio)?

    • Bravo! Perfectly said.

    • @Qumefox hurr durr look at me. i am too lazy to try to find free or cheap used towels. hurr duuurr ViDyA SuHgS!!!!!11!.... this !!!!DIY!!!!! video is clearly not for you, if the first thing you do is trying to order everything off of amazon, u brightest candle on the cake

    • @Rigo Cornejo that's what most acoustic engineers don't understand here. For someone with a 100$ used AV Receiver and ~200$ worth of 5.1 speakers... some towels will improve the sound a lot, it's definitely not about replacing proper sound treatment.

  • hey guys audio engineer here. Towels and sponge will only kill off high frequencies, leaving a honkiness and rumbling from like 1000hz and below. For a little more money (or free if you have it lying around) use housing insulation (rockwool). Also to make it work better, make an air gap between the panel and the wall! An inch of air gap has the same effect as an extra inch of panel thickness!

    • @Domino Domino I'm no expert, but I think the main issue is if it's exposed

    • so in conclusion rockwool isnt the safest to breathe in, but is it harmful, lets say, long term? I made a little booth for recording in my home and put rockwool all over it, so im a bit concerned. Now i just thought to put some kind of canvas or fabric over it for aesthetics

    • @smolikjr As long as the paint medium is not reflective, like heavy oil paint. Water paints, dyes, etc, should be fine as it simply changes the colour of the material and does not "build" or block the pores.

    • ​@Nick St Onge Very valid point. I just wanted to be safe and I guess was a little uninformed.

    • @James McCarthy the char on bbq chicken is a known carcinogen... or any burnt protein...

  • Hey there, I know its been a few years since you've posted this, but I just wanted to throw in that the testing you are doing for the sound panels are for sound isolation, not for sound absorption. If you look for professional sound isolation materials they tend to be very dense (which is why the towels worked very well, they were more dense than the foam you were using). The result is that you can have a drum tracking in one room, and barely hear it in the mixing room. This is different from sound absorption because those foam panels do a very good job at minimizing reflections. They take the sound and bounce it off in different directions, but not back at where the sound came from. To test this, it might be worth figuring out how to set up the microphone behind the speaker (so it doesn't pickup the speaker itself) with the speaker pointed at the material you are testing. At the end of the day, the towels worked really well for the job so no harm done. Just thought I'd offer my thoughts on why the test showed a different result. Cheers!

    • is it called sound isolation or insulation??

    • Make sense

    • @Trail Bike Mike Same here. Jumped right to the comment section looking for this. : ^)

    • @blakasmurf Yes. To anyone reading this far down: do not listen to the OP. For the intended purpose in the video, the towels far exceed the performance of that kind of foam. To achieve similar results you have to pay and arm and a leg in acoustic foam panels. This is a no brainer and will absolutely help you acoustically treat a room, for far less money. Inb4 bass traps, diffusers, etc. Yes those are also great. But it's apples and oranges. I would also recommend to buy these, in conjunction with the towel panels for the best experience.

    • I...uh. I'm sorry for being really dumb about this kind of stuff, and because of that..asking a dumb question. Would this be an ok idea for helping sound leaking out a room? For example, could I use a method like this for a room with a drum kit in it so neighbors can't hear any of the sound?

  • “There is nothing in the universe so massively useful as a towel.”

    • Duct-Tape Wire coat hanger Paperclip

    • 😂😂😂😂😂 and it's also massively alarming when you drop it by mistake coming out of shower

    • So you could make your own “booth” or “room” in a closet using the towel system! And achieve really good results!

    • Hitchhikers’ guide to the Galaxy”. Never forget your towel!

  • Feedback: I am in the middle of making 6 of these panels. For the most part the instructions here are good. BUT, DON'T BOTHER TRYING TO SEW 6 TOWELS TOGETHER. Trying to push a needle and thread through that much material is literally painful. Instead, I am gluing them together with spray adhesive. So far I have found 3M 77 Spray Adhesive to be excellent. And I give Gorilla Heavy Duty Spray Adhesive a score of 'very good'. Also, you will need dozens of towels to make a bunch of these like me. I posted in a local Facebook "Buy Nothing" group and got them all donated to me for free (just make sure you wash them all).

    • Literally painful because you forget people invented thimbles for this purpose and they still exist, lol.

    • So did it make a big difference?

    • Just say you don't know how to sew. It's fine! 😆 Let us know how it went!

    • Uh, just use thick comforters.

  • Definitely interesting. A better way to test however would be to use a sweep tone and a time windowed measurement so that you can place the test material on a hard acoustically reflective surface on the ground and measure the impact of the material on reflections. You're measuring how much sound transfers through the material, not how much is reflected back. This may or may not be a good indication of how well it reduces reflections in a room. It's a better indicator of how well it might avoid complaints from neighbors. From your test we know it's good at sound containment, we don't know for certain that it's good at absorption. With a time windowed measurement both the loudspeaker and the microphone are mounted in the air above the test area. The loudspeaker directs sound down at the floor where it reflects back up to the microphone. Sound also travels a direct path from the loudspeaker to the microphone but this sound is time windowed out of the measurement data. The sweep tone starts and the software waits enough time for the sound to reach the floor and bounce back to the microphone. Prior to that time the direct sound hitting the microphone is ignored. Once the initial reflected sound arrives at the microphone the software filters out and ignores every frequency but the start frequency of the sweep. This filter window sweeps with the sweep tone so that only the frequency just arriving from the floor reflection is included in the data. The sound arriving along the direct path from loudspeaker to microphone is ignored. First take a measurement of the reflection off the hard acoustically reflective floor surface. This is stored as your reference. Next you place the various test materials on the floor and overlay each materials data with the reference data. The difference tells you how many dB down the reflection is across frequency. Instead of just a few discrete frequencies with no scaling, you get a nice frequency response graph indicating exactly how effective the material is at absorbing sound as a function of frequency. I think the towels probably actually do work pretty well, possibly better than the acoustic foam you tested. It's just that this test isn't a true valid way of proving it.

  • In the old days, even before your parents were born, hanging carpets on the wall had three advantages; it dampened sound, retained heat and it looked great. It’s a shame we don’t reuse our old carpets now. A simple cleaning would extend their lives 100%.

    • @Ashley i think so, but i think it should be thick like 1-2 inch

    • so i can buy random rugs from home depot stores and use that ?

  • The piles of dirty laundry around my room now have their own special reason for existing. Acoustics.

    • Works for dirty underwear too.

    • genius !

    • Funny, but also effective (for real)l... Trying to get house-guests to buy into it might be an issue though. ;-)

  • I love this. I have never done testing, but I have always just hung up blankets and fabric on the walls when I lived in an apartment and had shared walls. It drastically cut down on noise transfer (and in places that weren't properly insulated- temperature transfer). And again, they can be found at the second-hand shops for relatively cheap and if you don't like the look of them you can just hang a prettier fabric on the top/outside and it works great. Might not look the coolest, but it is cheap and easy and can be done in multiple different ways from nailing blankets on the wall to layers of them to frames and on and on. This is also how I do curtains lol. But you can achieve trashy to classy with just a bit more money and/or effort. Thanks for sharing this with us and doing the fancy testing piece so people believe you lol ;) Cheers Edit: Also, wanted to say that you can easily still put shelving over top if you make less layering in places you need things to be flush to the wall (or you can even cut out holes- I try to just cut 3 sided holes in the smiley face direction so if I take the shelf down I can let the flap fall back down and mostly not look too bad).

  • RE-ASKING: Please forgive me if this question has already been asked.Does it make a difference if I use 1 large towel and fold it over 3 times to create 8 layers? Wouldn't folding produce the same acoustic results vs. your method of single layering? And reduce the already low cost significantly. Certainly, it eliminates the need for sewing together towels? Am i missing something? .I thank DIY Perks for this.

  • But you are not testing how much is reflecting that is actually the point you started with ( preventing sound waves from bouncing from the walls). If you kept trying other materials and as for example use a panel of drywall you will have the lowest level at the microphone and you would have arrived to the conclusion that drywall panel has more absorption. You would have covered your walls with more drywall panels and end up in the same situation. :) You need to measure absorption by means of how that affect r3flections.

    • True. He arrived at the correct results for the wrong reasons.

    • Very clever touch with the drywall joke, and a good point. Thanks

  • Interesting results! Would have been nice to have acoustic rock wool (batts) included as that is a common cheap/DIY alternative also. Thanks for taking the time to perform and share this experiment :)

  • Great video! I’m curious how well Home Depot/Lowe’s/Harbor Freight moving blankets would have worked.

    • Yeah I am buying enough to cover my entire loft I am an Artist and need Quite Space to Paint and block annoying loud neighbors too! Thanks so much. You are a genius

  • Incredible! Exactly what i need for my space :) Thanks Matt!

    • @DIY Perks are you never going to remove or correct this very flawed test and stop wasting people's time and money. Wouldn't you at least question your test methodology when you used an acoustic batt and found that the towels worked better?

    • @DIY Perks What about styrofoam boards?

    • Towels vs rockwool which one are better?

    • I been using a towel on the side of my ear when I sleep for years. I had no idea I was using the best sound material lol

  • The foam would give almost the same results for the reverb test because the first test he did with the different materials is not an absorption test, but a transmission test. I would still go for the towels because the transmission is important for me. Or else I'll wake up my parents in the middle of the might lol.

  • After so many years, this is still the "go to" video when friends want to make a home recording studio and ask me about acoustic treatment.

  • I wonder if painting them to give them a design would affect the performance. I'm thinking either spray or acrylic art... if anyone has attempted, I'd be interested in the results!

  • I built two of these and they work very well.... A little more than $5 a piece (I spent $25USD each), but their performance is incredible

  • Accidentally had this muted and was in turn extremely impressed with how well the panels worked for a moment

    • I could barely hear through the subtitles with my phone muted

    • MMCU Made Me Crack Up!

    • I appreciate your humor.

  • Awesome work! Another benefit from using towels is you can drape your towels over an amp/mic setup, for example. Just need to make sure your mic placement is not moved as a result.

  • The biggest problem in small room acoustics are low frequencues, so these panels alone won't do much for your room acoustics unfortunately...

  • This is a brilliant test that goes to show that the tighter weave of cotton has much better sound absorption than the expensive sound acoustic foam that you find even in high-end studio baffles. Absolutely ingenious trial and error testing with good equipment. I will incorporate this excellent method in my new ambient electronic studio. Thank you very much!!!

  • Appreciate this video and the educating discussion. Surely this has been asked and I’m sorry to repeat but, I’m thinking of doing these and pro acoustic panels. A mix per se. I’m just sprucing up the garage practice space so I think it’d with fit the requirements

  • YOU JUST ROCKED MY WORLD! I literally almost purchased some foam just hours ago. I record music at home and am desperately looking for inexpensive sound DIY's! If you could ever consider doing a vocal booth for recording, I would cry tears of joy! PLEASE consider it will you?! :) THANK YOU FOR ALL your content!

  • Great job and investigation! It would be nice to see the same tests on reflecting sound properties as well as tests of diy acoustic panel within different relative humidity. Cotton could hold pretty much humidity inside as wood does. Great job, anyway! )

  • Very nice visual representation. I wish more people would include that in their sound tests just to make the comparisons visually easier.

  • This seems to work really well. Another option would be packing blankets or even thick bed blankets if you need larger panels.

  • Matt I must say that your channel is one of my favourite channels on ILaward, they are always extremely well made and I can really tell that you are putting A LOT of work into them. They are often within reach for us lazy DIY:ers as well and I might actually do this one! Thanks for an awesome tutorial!

    • seriously the videos are very well organized and informative, thanks diy perks

    • Thank you! :)

  • I'm curious if wood is the best frame material, considering how reflective it is to sound. Also, I'm wondering if it would be more effective to use waved/folded towels packed in tightly, rather than having all of them parallel. Third, is using only one material the most effective, or is it better to use a heterogeneous stack?

  • Great video, Matt! Thanks for putting the time in. The panels sure look great! I'm a home recording artist btw. :)

  • Sound absorption and Sound Insulation are two different things, but it would appear in this case that the tests you did did have an impact, so bravo sir

  • The testing methodology is slightly wrong, you're measuring sound transmission rather than sound reflection. With that said I have no doubts about the fact that the towels should perform perfectly since afaik towels doesn't really reflect sound, but the results of the comparison might not be completely accurate.

  • I had a very strong "metallic" reverb in my room. I took 5 towels, folded them once and hung them up around the room. Obviously a temporary solution, but it took me 5 minutes and now my room has no obvious reverb. Towels are super good at absorption, thank you for the tip!

    • ik ya said temporary and ya probably fucked them off by now but what i did is use flags instead of a towl for the face of the frame looks really good they also use the flag thing at work to kill noise

  • Awesome tutorial! You answered all of my questions. I love the audio tests on the materials. Thank you so much!

  • Would making these and then wrapping them in canvas defeat their purpose? I wanted to turn these in to pieces of art around my studio.

  • The havier the fabric the better it will work. High mass absorbs energy, big surface against reflections. Therefore towels are a great idea! Thank you!

  • Outstanding! Great job. Just a another tip... if you mount those "towel panels" slightly offset from the wall, a centimetre or so of space, the panels become even more effective and even cut a little more low frequency. There are "Z" brackets that will perform that very mounting job.

  • Towels! I'm off to raid the airing cupboard, The kids can dry themselves with acoustic foam instead.

  • My needs are different: I would minime the noise of my electric tools in my little workshop to not bother the neighbors. So I should try to lower sound transmission instead of maximizing absorption to avoid echoes, yes?

  • A very comprehensive and interesting test. The only drawback I can see from your analysis is that in the garden you are testing how effective the materials are at preventing sound being transmitted whereas inside you are using them to prevent sound being reflected. You could well come up with a structure which was a great sound insulator (the first case) but was still very bad at preventing reflected sound (the second case). Just something to think about!

  • Just watched this 4 years later, and it’s amazing to see how the quality was always amazing!

  • Was reading apartment reviews about thin walls and need a soundproofing idea besides thick curtains for the windows and carpet for the floors, I needed something for the walls. This is amazing and will give me a fun diy craft to do while settling in

    • @Pablo Slalom this is what I would like to know. My party wall is dry wall only and neighbours are inconsiderate with noise! I have some underlay so may staple it to some battens and bang it through the wall!

    • @Modern Curtains not as good as a bath towel!

  • “A towel, [The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy] says, is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have. Partly it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapors; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine so redly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a miniraft down the slow heavy River Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes or avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (such a mind-boggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.”

    • Hitchhiked across the US back around 1970, CA to NJ. Got caught in a surprising snowstorm in April in Salt Lake City. Brrrr! What did I wrap around myself as I hid in a storefront from the storm? That's correct, my unwashed friends...it was a few towels that saved the day!

    • Love a man who knows their Hitchhiker! Brilliant.

    • Well, ain't you just about the biggest HGTTU nerd of all time.

    • The minute he mentioned towels being the best, I *knew* there had to be a Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy comment somewhere!

  • Your content is always well researched and well made !!! Thank you!

  • I've rigged up sound proofing for makeshift recording sessions by hanging blankets of off microphone stands and it works fairly well as well. If you come by shipping blankets I would definitely recommend that as a good material choice.

  • The test is indirectly measuring reflection since reflection does involve the sound transmitting twice through the material. Overall the purpose is best bang for buck which this does.

  • Excellent video. Would love to see how this DIY towel panels compare to a DIY glass wool panel. That would be the ultimate for us budget guys.

  • Towel sales went up 23.9% when this video was released.

    • They probably went up four years after the release of this video, considering how long it usually takes for "the algorithm" to deliver good videos to the audience...

    • David Eden-Sangwell Love your comment. Douglas Adams would have approved!

    • I almost spent so much money on sound treatment stuffs! So glad this came up randomly

    • Yea, but no one heard about it.

    • Lol haha

  • I was looking for cheap options to treat my room, and I was getting ready to throw in the towel (pun very much intended) but then I came across this great video! Thanks for the help!

  • Very helpful video, and I love the idea of recycling old materials. Thank you!

  • The only thing I would add to this (being a carpenter that has a music as a hobby) is that MDF is a much better wood to use for sound dampening. This is why it’s used for speakers. Thanks for the info I’l be building my towel panels soon. 👍🏻

  • Hey DIY Perks! Great video. I plan to make some for my lab, and I was wondering if I can have two layers on the top, first a towel, and then a decorative piece of cloth. Would the panels still function?

  • Hi! Environmental acoustic technician here; the foam panel is known to have very poor performance. A variable density polyester mat fares much better... almost as good as yours, which is truly impressive. The added benefit of the towels is mass, which can be kind of an hindrance but also greatly absorbs pressure waves. Great job!

  • Thank you very much for this! It's incredibly helpful, especially for people who (like me) are just starting out. All the very best from Toronto Canada

  • I did made my own panels for my studio, but never thought of making them with old towels. Nice creative idea! 😊👍🏻

  • Many things to love here, thank you for the ideas. The test itself is thought provoking. Thing most impressive ...try stuff. Don't think DIY is not good or better than what you might buy, Wood floors are here to stay. We have to make changes to compensate for echoey sounds that are just plain unpleasant. Do stuff as you go along. Used a birch plywood application for a bedroom wall which had had cheap installation. The drywall had been started at the ceiling. Last piece was at the floor, like a six -inch width drywall strip for the odd end. Whatja do that for? If numbered, it would be start at the top, # 1, next is #3, floor is #2. To make odd size at the floor makes for vibration and noise transmission. Using the odd width in the middle of the new wall, makes finishing and sanding easier, its waist high, easier to work with. Stagger studs, green tape, double drywall, putty around outlet boxes. Lots of things work, but first you have to implement. So far, we've done nothing. Try, and share your results. Some here have wondered, why not use towels in studs. Do not. Rots over time, would be inviting to rodents, spread a fire. Insulation made from blue denim sounded good....users say it settles. You had ceiling to floor...it settles by a third. When you build or repair, do it yourself or pay others.....think. If you put in hardwood floor, don't short -change....go all the way to avoid any gaps that would channel sound or critters. Use a flashlight. If you see light, it's a gap. Fill it. Love this vid, have forwarded to others. Little changes are helpful. Stash components for wall hangers Ilittle by little. Get old beach towels from friends. Make them some as you do yours. Use art store canvas stretchers....long ones are $3 each, need four, No cutting, the corners push together, no tools. Staple gun fabric or colored sheets. Do them assembly line to share with friends. Advantage to wall hangings is, you can move them around to try in different places. Going up a staircase is a must because it breaks sound transmission.

  • I'm going to make some of these to stop all the echos in my bakery shop, I'll get some prints on them to reflect what I sale instead of the walls reflecting voices. Thanks so much for the idea

    • How did it go? Can you post some pictures?

    • So, how it went? Did you install the towels, is it better now?

    • Buckarooz T You could use tea towels for the outer layer that are decorated with baking designs?

    • Any acoustic dampener is likely going to insulate too simply due to their weight

  • Seriously innovative and relatable! Excellent job. Thank you!

  • Hey man Thank you so much for these kinda experiments . This is so great 🙏 Now m ready to make some

  • Matt, I noticed that you used a Workmate to hold the wood and other materials. I've had and used one of these my self for over 30 years. It still works and has been used for many a project.

  • This was exactly what I was looking for. Great video! Thank you so much!

  • I believe the properties of professional acoustical tiles include them to be nonflammable. This is something to consider.

    • You know that curtains also have to conform to safety standards for this very reason...right? Eg (in my country) BS 5867-2:2008

    • youtube lawyers the best

    • +muffinluveruuu Judging by your comment im assuming you dont understand building codes lol

    • Tony tFuntek non flammable materials are one of the greatest causes of cyanide poisoning during a fire.

    • The towels Wong be flammable if you keep them constantly soaked with water. ;D

  • Incrível. Muito interessante e revelador essa demonstração. Thanks

  • Beautiful garden (backyard). Excellent experiment. Could you repeat it with moving blankets. That is something that comes in different qualities. I bought cheap ones for $3 a few years back (twin s mattress sized) and larger for $5 that are versatile. I have used them for sound dampening but would like to see results of an experiment.

  • Hi Matt, thank You for these valuable tips. Question:what Solution would You suggest to isolate the front líne of a house from the street noise of Cars passing by?

  • This is brilliant , bought a Minibar fridge and the buzzing was driving me mad. It reduced the sound it emits massively. Many thanks

  • Blankets work very well too, especially the quilted ones used by shipping/moving companies. You can get shipping blankets at places like Harbor Freight. Another source for cheap blankets, besides your local thrift shop as mentioned in the video, is military surplus stores. The military surplus blankets won't be quilted. When doing interviews in large rooms or shooting video demonstrations in a kitchen, cover as much of the hard floors as you can with the blankets. You can pile them up below and near the mic as well as behind chairs where the interview is happening to cut down on reflections. Keep the camera pointed towards the subjects and your audience will never see the mountains of blankets hidden in the room.

  • Great project, thank you. Have to add: White towels = cleaning nightmare. Simple solution... make covers from towels with 4 elastic corner straps at back (similar to a fitted sheet) that snugly fit over the frame. Can be different colors/patterns for variety and toss in the washer for cleaning.

  • definitely need to do this. Thanks for your little but so important research so now we know towels with frames are better then the overpriced trash panels and sponges 😁

  • Hi Matt, thanks a lot for this inspiring idea and the work you put into it to evaluate it. I am going to implement this. I have two questions: What were the measurements of the wood profiles you used and how many layers of towel fabric did you fit into the frame? Imn order to make the best use of a given number of towels, and considering effect as well as efficiency, do you think would it be worthwhile to make the frame thicker and put in even more towels to reduce reflection even more? I tend to think it would be better to make more panels to cover more of the hard surfaces in the room.

  • Moving blankets are pretty standard among musicians on a budget. Adding brass grommets around the edges permits tidy fastening to walls and ceilings.

  • Thank you for getting to the point. I watched the first minute or so of about 10 soundproofing vids before this one. Great work and THANK YOU. Subbed

  • That was SO awesome!!!!! Thank you for this. I would like to make some.

  • 👏👏... You are awesome. Thank you for your content. There is so much I've learned from your projects. I'm excited to see what comes next. Great job!

  • I know it's been a while since you posted it but this tutorial was so high quality I almost started crying. The craft, the graphics, the editing, the professional narration and humor. It reminded me of what is good content. Thank you :)

  • 4:51 I just thought of a z folding layout. 3 pannls but instead of a z, it’s a angular c or something surrounding the chair. Earlier I did have the idea of a curved metal frame that hangs over and essentially covers the entirety of where you sit. Kind of like throwing a towel over you and the mic, but held up by the frame.

  • Very interesting. I used a different method in my home theater but It's cool to see the comparisons. Thanks.

  • Cheap and friendly for the environment, awesome.

  • I've been struggling with sounds for so long and this will help soooooooooo much. Thank you. This is going to work so eell for my setup.

  • While he was drilling that frame his neighbors were searching for an effective soundproof DIY on youtube