How to recover data from a hard drive (stuck heads: buzzing, clicking, etc)

פורסם בתאריך 21 מרץ 2014
Does your hard drive make a buzzing noise when you turn it on? Or does it make clicking noises or not spin up? Well, in this video I will show you how to fix this fairly common problem which is caused by the drive's heads getting stuck on the platters. You'll definitely need this before starting: amzn.to/3rPHejx
In some cases, data recovery software may have to be used. Here is a good one to check out: Stellar Phoenix Windows Data Recovery - Professional bit.do/stellarphoenix
Want to be extra safe? You can build a clean air enclosure. Here's a video all about that:
ilaward.info/the/wyd-w/24R3w2WJyW7MhZQ

תגובות: 6 838

  • You'll definitely need this before starting any repair job: amzn.to/2mO5DRB

    • Where have you been?

    • Hi Matt. My verbatim external hard drive was not getting picked up by my laptop so I opened it and now it's making a loud ticking sound. How do I repair it and still maintain the data on it?

    • Mine makes a fast clicking sound in sets of 3 and I’ve had it for like 2 months

    • Can we dl that in bare hands

  • Been working on computers for over 25 years and this is the 1st time I've seen this trick. Tried it successfully on a damaged 3TB HDD. This comes to prove that and ol' dog in fact can learn new tricks! :D :D Good video!

    • 25 years and even you dont know this!

    • @Faizel Osman Am proud of you hacker 🖕 you solve my problem

    • I have done this before with success but you need steady hands - not easy!

    • @ecmorgan69 Same here….been working on them before Windows when DOS was the OS and hard drives had not been made available to PCs. This is the first video I’ve seen where someone successfully opened a drive, free the heads, then retrieved the data. Impressive.

    • Your comment also suggest you have an open mind! Good on you as these traits are slipping away daily.

  • YOU ARE A LIFE SAVER. I have been suffering from anxiety because of our hard drive. We waited and searched for months as to what we could do but all we found is to spend $1500 with an uncertainty that files won't be recovered. Last night we took a leap of faith to do this and we were screaming because it worked! Thank you for your help!!!

  • I hope you are reaping some serious rewards in monetising your knowledge this way. Not only are you intelligent, practically minded and clearly spoken, you have a pleasant non arrogant disposition so lacking amongst many of your peers and you make it an enjoyable experience learning from you. And after 20 years of self taught fumbling, you reveal such secrets and insights that would have saved me many hours and hopefully will in future. Big respect my good man. Best wishes.

    • Very well said. I could not agree more. Cheers.

  • For those of you who might try this or try transplanting the platters, it often works as a last ditch means of recovering data. But *don’t ever return a drive that you’ve opened, back to service* - it’s an absolute guarantee that you have introduced particle matter into the drive and this can cause cumulative damage over time until the platter or the head fail fully. It’s like having just a little bit of sand in your transmission… You can be virtually guaranteed that if he ran this test on this drive under normal use on a daily or weekly basis, that there is a significant chance that he would see progressive drive failure over a short period of time and it’s a huge gamble that those gradual failures might cost some valuable data or cause a complete system or total drive failure. This definitely works to recover some data, after which it’s time to drill/hammer the drive and toss!

  • There is a chance those damaged sectors were caused by dust particles. I recently tried just opening and closing a hard drive that was perfectly working but no longer had any important data on it, and that alone managed to screw up one or two sectors in the partition table (probably the worst place for it to happen, though recoverable). I would definitely recommend using a clean air enclosure like the DIY one on this channel, I'm building one right now before I do this on an actual stuck drive.

  • Hello, I would recommend lowering the hard drive temperature to 5-6 ° C (41-42 ° F) before moving the playhead. Due to thermal expansion the read head should be easier to move. Sometimes even the simple fact of lowering the temperature makes it possible to recover the disc without opening it. You can do this by putting the disc in the vegetable compartment of your refrigerator (10 min). And / Or put a tupperware on your disc with water and ice cubes (the water will remain at 0 ° C (32 ° F) as long as there are ice cubes) only when it is in operation because be careful, the temperature of the disc must not drop below 5 ° C (41 ° F).

  • That's brilliant. I've a selection of old hard drives which won't fire up. Absolutely nothing to lose by having a go at this. Thanks.

  • Interesting and presented in a logical straightforward manner. I have the cover of my SCSI drive loosened, and was looking for a technique to free the head. I had heard that it was better to spin the head as you did. So, here I go into the unknown. ( I'm kidding, I have had HDs apart, but never with the intent to get them running).

  • Awesome Matt, thanks so much for this easy tip. Should I have known earlier I would have been able to save a lot of movies lost from tossing drives out that I thought we buggered from his exact sound.

  • Thanks for this very useful video! As I was an engineer for WD, here are some responses to common comments from below: [1] Yes, opening the drive IS a _Last_Resort_ , giving you a chance to recover your data. You shouldn't expect the drive to survive indefinitely after "the operation". Opening the drive does let in contaminants, and since the heads fly at about 1nm from the surface of the disc, there is the probability of surface damage over time. Even with the filter, the winds in the drive will knock debris loose from the filter now and then. It is also because the fly-height is so small, that the heads & media must be so darn smooth that if the disc stops (stopping the airflow under the heads), the heads will likely WELD themselves to the surface. The media surface has many layers, including protective and "smoothing" upper layers, which likely suffer damage when the heads are un-stuck. Thus, though the data may be readable, that spot on the media becomes abrasive, the scab can grow, and is prone to failure. So get your data off quick! :-) [2] Removal & replacement of the discs themselves (say, for a busted motor) is impractical, save for experts, thus for very valuable data only. The drive they go in would have to be identical, and the parameters for head amplifier tuning would have to be transplanted to the drive's firmware with custom (factory) tools. Even so, the tracks on each disc would be very likely off-center, necessitating servo to track aggressively. If the data could be read, it's likely it would be with many soft-errors, many retries. [3] The drive firmware DOES try its best to make due, despite difficulties. Error correction codes are pretty good in modern drives, and drives expect to handle sectors which go bad, and replace them from a pool of backup good sectors. Error recovery algorithms are elaborate, and don't easily give-up. [4] Very minor criticism of video: Tapping the drive is less likely to un-stick the heads vs. rotating the drive. Because the head assembly is very finely balanced (keeps head seeks from shaking the drive), a linear shock (perpendicular to the head assembly axis-of-rotation) is unlikely to put an appreciable force on the actual head. Rotation, however, can work. As suddenly as you can, rotate the drive within the plane of it's discs. Both the media and heads will experience rotational forces. [5] Some older discs of 20 years ago parked their heads on the media, in a laser-textured (for non-stick) landing zone area at the inner diameter. Even these could sometimes stick, and needed a rotation to get them loose. Modern drives park their heads on a plastic ramp (orange, in the video), which also frees up more media area for data. [6] It's worth noting that some high performance, high capacity drives are helium-filled (better aerodynamics & heat-transfer characteristics). These drives are mostly welded closed to keep the helium in. Clearly, this wouldn't be for one of those drives. * Finally, to repeat: this is a last resort for data recovery. Don't expect your drive to be anywhere near reliable after this procedure. Count yourself lucky if it works for long enough to get your data off. :-) Thanks again DIY Perks for this very useful video! :-)

    • @Gamer Kangaroo I'm so sorry to hear of your drive problem. All the recovery techniques have their risks, so beware. It's worth trying the freezer trick, but just for long enough to unstick the heads: once you hear the drive spin up, remove the power (which should cause the drive to park the heads), wait for the drive to heat up to room temperature, then use the drive as normal. You can also try to rotate the drive in the same plane as its platters as you apply power: the inertia of the platters will put an additional shear force on the heads. This can harm the heads and disc surface though. If the data is very valuable, a data-recovery service is an option, though expensive. Good luck!

    • @Paul Kooros pls pls help me D: Paul...I dropped my 2tb seagate external hdd and judging by the sound the head is stuck...would you recomend to try the freezer trick or the tapping before opening it? I will send it to a technician and he will open the drive and try to unstuck it but I know this trick is really risky and modern drives are even more fragile.

    • Great video and tips from Paul. Unfortunately after opening, the heads are where they should be, so not stuck. Any ideas on what the clicking could be and any ideas on how to recover data (The drive just clicks and doesn't mount)? Many thanks in advance.

    • wd is shit with there external drives

    • my tower tipped over on its side today, and now my hard drive is making clicking noises. the diagnostics says that my hard drive is not detected. any tips on how to fix this? maybe bang it the other way? (i am semi-kidding about this method btw.)

  • Before you attempt banging the drive against a solid surface, first try the centripetal force method. 1. Hold the hard drive in your hand with the side of the drive facing the ground (or outward). 2. Fully extend your arm and keep it extended. 3. Raise your arm in the air (keep the side of the drive facing down). 4. While keeping your arm extended, swing your arm toward the floor. This accomplishes the same thing as tapping or banging the drive on hard surface without the major jolt or vibration. It's a more subtle approach to accomplish the same task.

  • I like your presentation, patience and also the way, you have generated hope for recovery of data from the old drive. One more additional point is sometimes when the drive is considered safe, packed and left in archive as back up and connected after 3-4 yrs , it not working , when we need really a kind of good power supply and clean up. The rusting due to oxidation, which is not visible locks the movable parts and this makes drive non functional and it requires a head assembly to be examined properly. Great video.

  • Hi DIY Perks, thank you very much for this video. Last week I recovered with the help of your video data from a HDD which head crashed 10 years ago. Not only did you save me a lot of money for a professional HDD data recovery, but also almost 3 years of photos (and the memories which come along with them). Here is what I did: 1. The external HDD was making strange intermittend noises and I could not mount it. So I hit it sideways on the table as you suggested and it spun up and I could mount it. 2. Using the Linux command line tool "ddrescue" I copied the hard drive to a new one. Unfortunately the copy was not yet readable, because the file system was compromized. 3. Because the file system was exfat, I couldn't repair the copy under Linux, so I switched to Windows and used the command line tool "chkdsk", which fixed the file system. Now everything works and I am really happy! :-) THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU!

  • your tutorial is simply excellent (short, clear, precise).. fantastic! how far did you get with your disk replacing trials?

  • Dear, sir! Thank you, so very very much for your excellent instruction on how to repair a problematic hard drive disk! Really appreciating your language too! Clear and caring! Wishing you, sir, all the very best, always! Best Regards, from Sweden! Stay safe and healthy, in these perilous pandemic days!

  • An excellent tutorial for first-timers interested in a 50-50 chance of destroying your hard drive and losing your data permanently.

  • I was a PC repair tech for three years while this video was out. Wish I had seen it then. Would have made countless customers very happy.

  • Thank you Matt! I did enjoy the video and all the information is very appreciated. I had a couple 10yr old drives I repaired by replacing with new PC boards and it worked. Another drive was making god awful clicking sounds so I set that one aside about 9 years ago. I'll give that one a looking over soon with the new info. But I hear some newer and certain models cant be repaired by replacing the PC board and that is because data stored on the PC board is specifically for that drive and the data has to be transferred to the new board by a technician. According to the companies support web site at least. I may order a new board and test that theory out as well. Oh and just to put the info out there for others, some hard drives wont spin up or be seen sometimes if there on a ribbon cable with certain other drives, Master/Slave ribbon cables, and also depending on the pin jumper settings of either drives. Best to test each drive individually to see if that is the case. Thank you again for a wonderful informative video! Look forward to checking out your others :-)

  • Just a reminder...If after opening the drive and successfully accessing the data...get all your data on another storage drive and never use the broken drive ever. Otherwise, you'll risk losing more data in the future. Great video Matt!!

  • You Sir Are Amazing! Just recovered all the Data on an old drive that went bad over 15yrs ago 😉👍

  • Thank Matt. A nice presentation with helpful info aside from the blowing on it bit. Maybe try nitrogen instead? Also, I bought an antistatic strap ages ago. They are worth considering. (Spelling edited - small phone keypad!)

  • Excellent tutorial, thank you!! I'm clearly no expert, but now I'm much more confident that I can perform this surgery on my external WD disk! I know you're not using Mac, but do you (or anyone else) know of an Apple version of the sector error scan at 8:35? I'd be curious to see the percent of damage done to my disk post-op

  • Thanks Matt for this very, very useful video. I hv been keeping my old and inoperable hdd which I hv used more 11 years ago hoping one day someone could fix it for me. Now I hv this tips from you, I’ll try. Hoping for the best.

  • Thanks for this video. My hard drive face the same problem. Tried your step by step guide and manage to retrieve every data and stuffs back. Your video is absolutely amazing!

  • Very interesting and useful video. Just out of curiosity, why do we need to spin the platter manually while pulling off the head?

  • I OWE YOU !!! From the noise my hard drive was in the situation you explained very well in the tutorial. With your indications I was able to get it started again.

  • Great work. Mine had the same issue. It was an external drive wd my passport ultra. I moved it back just like you did here in the video.

  • Great videos! One thing to consider, files aren't necessarily in order on the drive so 2% corruption could affect 100% of files or only 1 file... likely somewhere in between but 2% corruption probably affects more than 2% of files, the larger the average file size the higher the odds more files overlap that 2% corruption

  • Wow, in my house, the instant I remove the cover, dust is all over the platter. I am quite impressed how little dust is in your environment - I didn't see a single particle in your video!

  • Hello to you Sir, I have recently discovered your youtube sites and am enjoying them greatly. The thing though is that I am not an electrical man, but I used to be one on a smaller scale 46yrs ago; and I would like to know if you can go through your tests of a unit step by step more so as to what tools you use and which ones I will need to have too so that I can give them a go and and how to test these things better and how to silver weld stuff too. Your work has motivated me to want to get back into such things and make a hobby out of doing them too. many thanks Tom Seath Mount Gambier South Australia.

  • Awesome work. I have a 4TB drive full of stuff that died on me. I have nothing to lose so I'll try this and hopefully I can recover my data. Subscribed.

  • What a clean video and audio..and loads of info! Thanks mate!

  • Awesome! I have had a few of these drives come through my shop, and haven't had the guts to try this! After watching and checking out others' comments. I am absolutely going to try this! Thank you!

  • Really amazing! this video was made 7 years ago and, now is really incredible. THANKS MATT.

  • Just fixed my hard drive Dat was broken 4 years back. Been keeping it and now it's 100% work g. Thank you Mr

  • I had literally done the hitting sideways technique for so long on my old hardrive while having no idea why it worked. I just did it via trial and error but Im surprised to see it actually has a reasoning

  • Mate, this is brilliant! I've always wondered about doing this myself, and never had the guts to try it on a drive I wanted to use afterward. I agree about the box vs. the clean room. The clean room is an ideal environment, but not entirely necessary. Thanks for dispelling the myth. I also didn't know what to do about the ticking noises until now. Well done!

  • Great video. Very good info. It was concise and to the point and I was able to save my Samsung Hard Drive. Thank You for sharing this.

  • You sir are a legend Thank you your video has saved 300,000 personal photos with your clearly & well explained video in the past I would have thrown the Ext HD away..I can’t thank you enough! Even better I never lost a single photo..

  • DUDE!!!......years later and you're still saving lives!!! Thank you so much

  • Hi, I followed the exact instructions of the video, but when I opened the drive the head wasn't moved on the disc and it was in the same place where it has to be. Since I had the exact same clicking noise coming from the hard drive, I followed your instruction from the video. Prior to that, I also check if the hard was working in a different computer and other ports but still the same. Can you please advice what else I can do to fix this?

  • This was the most helpful video. Period. This is what enabled me to recover data from a drive everyone else told me was completely dead. Thank you, sir!

  • VERY NICE PRESENTATION! YOU ARE A NATURAL COMMUNICATOR, WITH WELL PACED REVELATION, AND CLEARLY A WELL EXERCISED PATIENCE. THANK YOU!

  • Hello Matt, Thank you for sharing this reassuring video. I have a couple of questions: 1) Before opening the HD could you see the Icon of the Drive appearing on your laptop when plugged in? (In my case, I have a Seagate 4 TB and I cannot see the icon appearing on the desktop) 2) Once the data are recovered, does the name of the files changes? (I store photographs mainly and would like to know if the file name always changes after recovery) Please let me know when you can Thank you again Monia

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  • This totally worked! Thanks for posting this video. I can’t afford data recovery, so I used the “hit it sideways onto a table surface” method.

  • 'Giving it a whack'... your number one choice for repairing stuff since the stone age. Thank you, my backup drive lives again!

    • 🤣 🤣

  • Thanks for the video. I'm going to give this a try on two of my oldest data drives that aren't spinning up. Fortunately, I work for a cleanroom certification company and we have many hoods at our facility I can use to perform this method in a "clean" environment.

  • Thank you. I opened my hard drive to find this problem. I only need to recover some documents and pictures so this was great!!! ❤

  • I once ran a perfectly working HDD (although antiquated at that point) without a cover. It worked well for about 5 minutes, and then it started catching more and more errors until entire PC froze. The drive never started again, it continued to freeze the PC on startup - so yes, it's true - running a HDD without a cover outside a clean room definitely CAN damage it. (I'm not saying that it always will)

  • On the point about dust, I studied computer forensics as a degree and dust can cause what is known as a head crash, this is where dust gets in the way and causes the head to crash into the platter destroying the top layer and wiping that data. This is a very real concern so if you don’t have a room that has air that is relatively dust free then do not open your drive.

  • If you want to minimize dust exposure, set up your workspace on the counter in a bathroom. Run a hot shower for a few minutes and then wait for the steam to dissipate. Dont open the door or move around too much. You will have 10-20 minutes of a relatively dust free workspace.

    • @Tom Karlsborn It's a bit counter-intuitive but makes sense to me. The steam is the liquid moisture in the air transforming into gas which is called evaporation, right? While the steam is present, sure, not a good idea. It means there is still plenty of moisture that hasn't been transformed to gas. But once you stop running the water and the steam is gone after a few minutes, you actually have a time window where the air will now be dryer than before, because of that evaporation. A clothes iron demonstrates this process in a far quicker space of time, literally seconds. The iron is pressed against the clothes, some steam is released, the clothes can get a little wet but then with the heat the moisture transforms to gas, and in no time at all the clothes are dryer than they were before, as well as creaseless. For a longer time period example, try to think of the weather and times when you have been in a very humid location, really feeling that energy-draining humidity, and then it has finally rained, and a few hours after the air is lovely and drier than before. As for the dust - the water content earlier will have collected and carried a good amount of it down to the floor where it will stick and sit for a while (if you don't move around much later), similar to the ancient method of sprinkling water on floors prior to dusting. At least, in theory. :)

    • @Tom Karlsborn not really i tied to put a hdd ona a freezer for 12 hrs just to make it work. and when I try to plug it in it still works and reading my hdd, tho I cant acces the drive because thats the main reason I put it in the feezer because of the hdd health is 3% and cant load the fles in it but still reading the hdd well.

    • I really think that a DRY and dust free environment is what you want. Too much moisture is very bad.

    • Or even better: To maximize moisture damage, run it directly under the faucet! (I really can't tell if you're being serious?)

  • Very nice and decent manner of explaining. Thank You

  • I have been doing hard drive data recovery for years, and this video has some big problems that need to be clarified, especially since this video is making it's rounds to people's recommended videos. It isn't enough to state "Do this is at your own risk" as that doesn't help others understand the risk is. Hard drives are very very precise, sensitive tools. The head floats on the smallest amount of air between the platter and the actual read/write head. This gap is measured down to Nanometers, and some times even less for larger drives. Dust and particles getting under the head while the drive is running WILL damage or misalign the head from reading any data. The warnings from others regarding opening a hard drive is a very true statement. To call it a scare tarictic tells me that a severe lack of research was done. Opening a drive is a huge risk, and all it takes is one dust particle in the right place, then it's game over. 2nd, Do NOT blow onto a hard drive platter. Ever. The humidity in your breath can and will stick to the platter, further increasing the risk of damaging your read head. That being said, I am glad his efforts to pull the head off the platter worked out. That suggestion and advice is good, and I have had to do this for many drives, myself. I just cannot over look the bad advice given earlier in this video. In closing, please please please do your research and take this video with a grain of salt.

    • Respect your opinion, I'll take this on board. I'll wear two face masks to be safe

  • Interesting video. Thanks. I would like to have known other sounds and what they may mean. My hard drive recently had no sound. I just bought another hard drive and cloned it from an older image file I had. Also would like to have seen a video with a platter transfers which you mentioned you might make...went to your channel, non found. Found other videos on this from other people but I like how you describe things.

  • I just did this to my non working ext drive and IT WORKED. Thank you!!

  • Matt, I believe this will help me recover most of my data - Thank you!

  • Very interesting content. Thanks! Will try this to my old and not working HDDs.

  • Hi, I follow your advice and I have recover my hard drive with success... Many thanks

  • Holy cow! I have discarded many dead drives in my day that were "unrecoverable". One of my clients had a 500GB Seagate drive with client tax data that they had not backed up and it was humming. Before finding your video this is not something I would have ever dared. However, I successfully "unstuck" the read/write head, spun up the drive and recovered several years of tax data for them. Thanks SO MUCH for your video!

  • I can't express in words how much I love you for this... I went to a recovery data center and they were gonna charge me 800€+.. I saw your video and luckily I got the same problem as you, and in less than half an hour doing what you advised, I am now recovering my info successfully! Thank you very much

    • What did you end up doing? My Buffalo external hard drive which stands up vertically fell over and now makes a clicking sound, this was a few years ago. I've just got a quote from a company and they are quoting me £500, it has a lot of picture memories on it but £500 is a lot of money!

    • @DIY Perks Hi, I have a 250GB WD 3.5" HDD that doesn't have that issue shown on here, but it does turn on and sounds like it starts spinning but after 0.8-1.3 seconds when it reach certain speed it start clicking and do it for 3-4 times, then it sounds like it completely turn off. Contingently, Anandtech made an experiment more than year ago using the exact same HDD and with exactly the same problem as mine, the author tried to do an plate(s) transplant and failed at it, after that I feared to try it myself and kept the HDD for when I can afford the data recovery, you you think it would work for me? Thank you. EDIT: I found the article, mine is the one with the black case. www.anandtech.com/show/7330/hardware-tricks-how-to-not-fix-a-crashed-hard-drive

    • @Luis Febrero Great to hear!!

  • This was the most helpful video I have ever seen. I have repaired 5 of my old hard drives kept for years

  • Excellent Tutorial. Slow and detailed.

  • Thanks to this video I saved $400 worth of repair. I went to 3 technicians already and everyone was charging me about $50-100 bucks and the repair would last a week or so and the recovery of my files were very minimal.. I followed your guide here, the pin was infact in the disk, I moved it just the way you did, and pulled the pin with my finger, and voila I dragged it to the parking dock. I plugged it and I was able to access my files again. So thank you!

  • Great topic I enjoyed learning how to fix a clicking hard drive. It was great to see the enthusiasm and wonder of DYI Perks when he described it is actually working now!

  • Thank you for this tutorial. I got the same problem and I managed to retrieve my data + I didn't spend on data retrieval. Kudos to this!

  • Thank you for posting the tools you got through Amazon, that helps a lot. I'm praying your video helps me out with recovering my photos saved from YEARS AND YEARS. Most of them are stored on FB, but imagine how long it'll take to download each one of them! There's a service they should have thought about and charge for! Great Idea, but hopefully I can get my photos before they charge. Can you do a video explaining what is meant by partitions and all that? Thank you for the great info. My drive makes no noise except that it's turning on, but the lap top does not pick up the drive. Ive also tried different chords because sometimes it's the chord you are using that is not helping.

  • It worked perfectly after trying this method. Thanks for this video.

  • Well presented. So many of these youtube howto videos give little time, attention and effort to even speak slowly and clearly beyond a mumble, much less include all the relevant details. I'm gonna at least open up my old dead HDD and have a looksee now. Your excellent video gives me the courage.

  • Thank you very much with this video. I had the same problem but with thanks to your video I succeeded !

  • I have been looking for some troubleshooting steps recently because my external hard drive is no longer being recognized by any computers here. Might as well give this a try. Thanks for creating this content!

    • @Ian Eugenio awesome! Yeah I tend to be the same haha. Thanks!

    • @Christopher Chay same thoughts actually on repair folks charging more when they see you've tampered the item or did a little work on your own. But being the DIY guy that I am, as much as possible I try to fix things around - and do much of the troubleshooting by myself first, before I even consider asking for professional help. Just in case you try this one out - just a word caution when lifting the metal plate cover for the disk, I didn't realize the resistance on it was because of a thick adhesive (just like those that you see on the back panel of smartphones) -- just be patient and be extra careful. Goodluck!

    • @Ian Eugenio yeah I'm almost definitely having the same problem. A bit nervous to open it up (apparently the folks who do recovery charge more if they can see you fooled around) It's weird because it came back on, so I moved all my files but when it said "finished" I checked and it'd moved nothing 🤔 really strange

    • @Christopher Chay Yes it was. And discovered that the hands was also stuck against the rotating plate itself. When normally (when not in use) the hands shouldn't be there. So I fixed that, but apparently the there problems where more than that, it wasn't just the hands being stuck. There are corroded contact points on the circuit board itself. The golden portions/contact points. looks lie it deteriorated over time. Had this hard drive since 2011. I can still save my data, but that means I have to buy the same old type/brand of hard drive so I can borrow its circuit board, to read the data on the old disk

    • Any luck? Was it making a clicking sound?

  • I have working in computers for 31 years & have never heard of this tecnique either! Well played sir!!! Will be looking more at your channel. Big LIKE on this one!

  • Remember: Opening a HDD and exposing the platters and head will almost guarantee drive failure. The HDD will rely on the vacuum to read data.

    • This is not true. You are thinking of helium filled drives, which this is not.

  • This was very helpful. Thank you.

  • Dude! Holy shit, I can't thank you enough. My external 2,5" HDD had a Headcrash and the german companies for Data-recovery offered to rescue my data for only 600€. No joke! Then I came across your tutorial and it worked absolutely fine. Thank you so much. Ben

    • Ronny Rakete Do you keep using that drive or did you backup and get a new one?

  • wow...nice and easy tutorial...God bless you!

  • Grandioso! gracias por la inducción e información, para estar mas seguro le podría hacer en una cabina de vidrio con filtro de ppm y realizar la maniobra descrita en su video. interesante.

  • I wish I'd seen this before attempting to get a drive working. My heads were extremely stuck like yours, but my big mistake was to try turning the platters backward after they didn't get unstuck when turned forward. The result was the heads bent backwards on their mountings. When I did get them unstuck and got them back to the parked position, when I fired up the drive the heads moved onto the platters about a third of the way in but gave up and returned to the parked positon and the platters stopped turning.

  • THANK YOU SO MUCH! :) This worked very well for me

  • Wonderful presentation. Useful and pleasant to watch too. Thank you!